How a consulting firm realized their marketing skills gap was impacting sales

Our client, a national consulting firm, came to us originally because they needed a website developed for a client on an expedited timeline. Over time, as the firm’s needs grew, we became their strategic marketing partners. 

The client has multiple affiliates, each with its own brand. The differentiation between brands wasn’t clear within the company, so it was impossible to convey that differentiation to prospective clients. Each brand created its own messaging and marketing in a silo, which sometimes led to two brands saying they did the same things, or one brand contradicting what the other brand was saying.

Because the client’s service offerings were unique, the client felt they didn’t have any competitors. What they weren’t taking into consideration, though, was their perceived competitors: the consulting firms that people were hiring instead of our client – even though those firms didn’t provide the same level or breadth of services. Our client wasn’t offering prospective clients any information about how it was different from those perceived competitors, causing it to lose significant business opportunities. 

The firm works with different types of clients in a range of business cycle stages. While their “one size fits all” approach to marketing could be quickly executed, it wasn’t yielding good lead generation results. The firm knew that different business stages had different needs and required different solutions, but that wasn’t being communicated through the firm’s marketing or sales materials. In the minds of prospective clients, the firm was asking for a long-term investment without making the effort to understand buyers’ needs. 

Like most professional firms, most of our client’s time was spent servicing its own clients, leaving little to no time to strategize solutions to these problems or take even small, incremental steps toward improvement. Big-picture marketing initiatives had been tabled. Day-to-day sales needs (marketing brochures, positioning statements, lead gen emails) were delayed or ignored, and everything was behind schedule. This meant marketing and sales enablement were always on one of two states: dormant or on fire.

The consulting firm needed immediate triage, followed by a strong marketing foundation on which to build future efforts. They also needed to break the log jam of people and approvals that was keeping their marketing from moving forward.

The firm ultimately decided to outsource all of its marketing and sales enablement to our firm, based on our ability to deliver superior results in a shortened time frame and at a lower annual cost than maintaining an in-house marketing team.

Need a marketing roadmap to guide your firm? 

How Large Architecture Firms Can Be Better at Social Media

How Large Architecture Firms Can Be Better at Social Media

Most large architecture firms have a social media presence. Social media is a tool, though, and like any tool, how you use it matters. We find that large architecture firm social media tends to fall into one of these categories: Technically Alive, Barely Breathing...

Why Law Firms Should Be Wary of Legal Marketing Services

Why Law Firms Should Be Wary of Legal Marketing Services

Most law firms are familiar with companies that offer subscription-based “legal marketing services.” For a monthly fee, law firms are promised a website combined with several other services: a listing in a directory, a dedicated page on the vendor’s website,...

Is Your Architectural Products Firm Selling Hamburgers?

Is Your Architectural Products Firm Selling Hamburgers?

We recently spoke with an architectural products and services firm that wanted our help to achieve more sales. Their problems were ones we could solve, but we ran into an issue regarding approach. “You know how McDonald’s does their marketing?” the firm rep asked....